A Brief History of Ink-painting Animation in Hong Kong

By Ann Y. Y. Leung The world-renowned style of Chinese ink-painting animation emerged in 1960 with the release of Little Tadpoles Look for Mama, produced by the Shanghai Animation Film Studio. In terms of art style, this animation studio released a similar animated short film, The Herd Boy’s Flute in 1963, and then Deer Bell … Continue reading A Brief History of Ink-painting Animation in Hong Kong

Bell Boy: Cartoonists and Animated Filmmaking in Southern China, 1940–1949

By Muyang Zhuang In December 2020, an exhibition was held by the Guardian Art Center in Beijing to celebrate the 120th birthday of Zhang Guangyu (1900–1965), one of the most important Chinese cartoonists. According to the curator, Zhang Guangyu was the pioneer of not only Chinese cartoons, but also graphic design and animation.[1]The curator divided … Continue reading Bell Boy: Cartoonists and Animated Filmmaking in Southern China, 1940–1949

Animation and the Republican Chinese Film Industry

By Christopher Rea Animation appears throughout Chinese cinema of the Republican era (1912-1949). Historians have paid close attention to the handful of available fully-animated Republican films. Yet dozens of live-action films also include animated segments, and examining where, when, and why such short animations appear might open up new possible approaches both to animation studies … Continue reading Animation and the Republican Chinese Film Industry

Journey to the Best: A Journey through Law and Policy for a Flourishing Chinese Animation Industry

By Adela Hurtado It was Fall 2016, and I was studying law for a semester in Shanghai at the East China University of Political Science and Law (“ECUPL”) when I first became interested in Chinese animation. I had loved China itself since I was a child after reading “Romance of the Three Kingdoms” in the … Continue reading Journey to the Best: A Journey through Law and Policy for a Flourishing Chinese Animation Industry

Hauntological Aesthetics in Taiwanese Animation Feature Grandma and Her Ghosts (1998)

By Li Guo In her recently published monograph Puppets, Gods, and Brands: Theorizing the Age of Animation from Taiwan, Teri Silvio insightfully observes that for the author, the animation model could also be utilized to display “how specific local cultural traditions make sense of and contribute to global transformations.”[1] Further, Silvio observes that “recent transformations … Continue reading Hauntological Aesthetics in Taiwanese Animation Feature Grandma and Her Ghosts (1998)

An Overview of Animation Studies in Mainland China, 1949-2020

By CHEN Yishui; adapted by Yixing Li While Chinese animation originated in the 1920s and had an early impact on world animation, animation studies in mainland China remained rudimentary until the founding of the People’s Republic of China in 1949. The field developed steadily after the Reform and Opening-up and has made significant progress in … Continue reading An Overview of Animation Studies in Mainland China, 1949-2020

Narratological Analysis of Fellow Ants, Please Be Aware!

By Nick Stember Published in May 1980 by the Shanghai Fine Arts Press, Fellow Ants, Please Be Aware!is a 46 page long, full color lianhuanhua (linked pictures) with an initial print run of 400,000. While traditional narratological analysis (as exemplified by Vladimir Propp) is perhaps difficult to apply to this story given the distinct cultural … Continue reading Narratological Analysis of Fellow Ants, Please Be Aware!